Task 51
Task 51
SHC Task 51

Solar Energy in Urban Planning

Project (Task) Publications

Search:
| Advanced Search | Clear
Order by:

The following are publications developed under Task 51:

Subtasks

Subtask C: Case studies and action research

Illustrative Prospective of Solar Energy in Urban Planning Illustrative Prospective of Solar Energy in Urban Planning
Collection of International Case Studies
June 2017 - PDF 53.78MB - Posted: 2017-06-07
By: Daiva Walangitang, Ernst Rainer, Hans-Martin Neumann, Markus Gratzl, Michael Malderle, Thomas Mach, Alexandre Pavlovski, Caroline Hachem-Vermette, Kelsey Saunders, Marlene Moore, Miljana Horvat, Natalie Robertson, Nazanin Sephery-Rad, Jianqing He, Karin Kappel, Olaf Bruun Jørgensen, Simon Stendorf Sørensen, Anne Monnier, Aymeric Delmas, Christophe Menezo, François Garde, Marjorie Musy, Virginie Grosdemouge, Katharina Simon, Margarethe Korolkow, Romain Nouvel, Tanja Siems, Alessandra Scognamiglio, Mauro Caini, Rossana Paparella, Silvia Croce, Annemie Wyckmans, Carmel Lindkvist, Gabriele Lobaccaro, Johan Dahlberg, Jouri Kanters, Maria Wall, Marja Lundgren, Mats Hachem-Åberg, Christina S. Polo López, Christian Roecker, Emilie Nault, Erika Saretta, Giuseppe Peronato, Francesco Frontini, Maria Cristina Munari Probst, Pietro Florio
Editor: Gabriele Lobaccaro, Carmel Lindkvist, Maria Wall & Annemie Wyckmans
Publisher: IEA SHC Task 51
This reports presents a collection of 34 case studies on solar energy in urban planning, addressing how the planning process has been developed, how the stakeholders have been involved, which instruments have been applied, which energy technology and environmental impact have been addressed and what the role was of the researchers during the entire process. The case studies from 10 countries include examples of new urban areas, existing urban areas and landscapes.
Document Number: Task 51/Report C1

Subtask D: Education and dissemination

Summer Schools on Solar Energy in Urban Planning (English) Summer Schools on Solar Energy in Urban Planning (English)
Teaching Methodologies and Results
June 2017 - PDF 25.55MB - Posted: 2017-06-19
By: Tanja Siems & Katharina Simon
Editor: Tanja Siems & Katharina Simon
Publisher: IEA SHC Task 51
This booklet describes an interdisciplinary summer school on solar energy in urban planning. Teaching methodologies and results are shown as an applied example of successful collaboration between teaching, research and practice, to serve as inspiration and encouragement for educators.

(German) Die Broschüre beschreibt die interdisziplinäre Sommerakademie, welche sich mit der Nutzung von solaren Potenzialen im städtebaulichen Kontext auseinandergesetzt hat. Lehrmethoden und Ergebnisse werden beschrieben, die sich auf einer erfolgreichen Zusammenarbeit von Lehre, Forschung und Praxis gründen und als Inspiration und Unterstützung für Lehrende dienen sollen.
State-of-the-Art of Education on Solar Energy in Urban Planning State-of-the-Art of Education on Solar Energy in Urban Planning
Part 1: Approaches and Methods in Education
May 2017 - PDF 14.01MB - Posted: 2017-06-02
By: Aymeric Delmas, Pietro Florio, Caroline Hachem- Vermette, Miljana Horvat, François Garde, Daiva Jakutyte-Walangitang, Jouri Kanters, Gabriele Lobaccaro, Marja Lundgren, Maria Cristina Munari Probst, Carmel Margaret Lindkvist, Thomas Mach, Michael Malderle, Emilie Nault, Rossana Paparella, Giuseppe Peronato, Cristina S. Polo López, Ernst Rainer, Pamela Robinson, Erika Saretta, Kelsey Saunders, Nava Shahin, Tanja Siems, Katharina Simon, Mark Snow, Tobias Weiss
Editor: Tanja Siems, Katharina Simon & Maria Wall
Publisher: IEA SHC Task 51
This report focuses on education in order to strengthen the knowledge and competence of relevant stakeholders in solar energy in urban planning. The core of this study is to create substantial links between research and education as well as between research and practice. Knowledge gaps in current education were investigated, reasons for these gaps were identified and solutions and strategies are proposed to overcome these shortcomings.
Document Number: Task 51/Report D1 Part 1
Web-site: Innovative solar products for architectural integration
June 2013 - Posted: 2017-06-16
By: Maria Cristina Munari Probst, Christian Roecker, Laurent Deschamps (EPFL-LESO). Products updates June 2013 - June 2017: Pietro Florio, Maria Cristina Munari Probst.
Publisher: IEA SHC
This website shows in an attractive way the innovative/inspiring solar products for building integration now available on the market. The website is dedicated to architects and has three sections: photovoltaic, solar thermal and hybrid systems. By choosing a specific technology and integration approach (roof integration, facade integration, balcony etc) the user receives a selection of appropriate products, presented in the form of virtual A4 sheets. These sheets include dedicated information, contact details and pictures, both of the product alone and in situation on buildings. The website was developed by Task 41, Subtask A, and will continue to be updated within Subtask D in Task 51.

Other

Articles

Summer School with a Twist Summer School with a Twist
SHC Solar Update - December 2016
December 2016 - PDF 0.36MB - Posted: 2017-05-30
By: Tanja Siems, Katharina Simon, Susanne Rexroth, Gustav Hillmann, Margarethe Korolkow
The recently held summer school, “City in Transformation: Energy and the Urban Environment“ brought students together with researchers and teachers in combination with the IEA SHC Task on Solar Energy in Urban Planning. Over the course of a week, students from different fields and German universities developed a master plan for solar optimized buildings in an area of Berlin’s Adlershof district and then publically presented project designs.
Promoting Solar Energy While Preserving Urban Context Promoting Solar Energy While Preserving Urban Context
SHC Solar Update - May 2016
May 2016 - PDF 0.5MB - Posted: 2017-05-30
By: Maria Cristina Munari Probst, Christian Roecker
New energy regulations, together with mandatory solar fractions for electricity and Domestic Hot Water are introducing new materialities and geometries in buildings, resulting in new forms of architectural expression that are slowly modifying our city landscapes. The increased use of active solar collectors in buildings is clearly necessary and welcome, but brings major challenges in already existing environments. The large size of solar systems at the building scale asks for thoughtful planning, as these systems may end up compromising the quality of the building, threatening the identity of entire contexts.
State-of-the-Art: Solar Energy in Urban Planning Education State-of-the-Art: Solar Energy in Urban Planning Education
SHC Solar Update - November 2015
November 2015 - PDF 0.18MB - Posted: 2017-05-30
By: Tanja Siems, Katharina Simon, Karsten Voss
Publisher: IEA SHC
Education and dissemination are important issues for SHC Task 51 on Solar Energy in Urban Planning. As part of this work, Subtask D experts are focusing on educational issues to strengthen the knowledge and competence in solar energy and urban planning of relevant stakeholders, including university students, planners and other professionals. The creation of a substantial link between research and education as well as between research and practice is the core of Subtask D. This subtask is working to determine where deficits currently exist and then will evaluate the reasons for these deficits and propose solutions and strategies to overcome these shortcomings.

Highlights

Task 51 Highlights 2016 Task 51 Highlights 2016
April 2017 - PDF 1.97MB - Posted: 2017-05-30
By: Task 51/Maria Wall
A report on the state-of-the-art in education regarding urban planning with solar energy will be published in early 2017. The main conclusion from this work is that there are many courses dealing with solar energy, but most of these courses are in engineering and architecture programs and focus on the technical aspects of solar energy, such as materials, system components and the construction of solar systems. In urban design and urban planning programs there are only few courses dealing with this topic. Thus, a huge gap is detected in urban planning education. A complementary report is drafted that covers the state-of-the-art on solar tools in education. The review of existing urban planning legislation and voluntary initiatives and of existing urban planning processes in participating countries is now compiled and will be prepared for the SHC review process.
Task 51 Highlights 2015 Task 51 Highlights 2015
April 2016 - PDF 0.12MB - Posted: 2017-05-30
By: Task 51/Maria Wall
The main objective of SHC Task 51 is to provide support to urban planners, authorities and architects to achieve urban areas, and eventually whole cities, with architecturally integrated solar energy solutions (active and passive) that contribute a large fraction of the renewable energy supply in cities. Results will include processes, methods and tools to assist cities with developing a long-term urban energy strategy.
Task 51 Highlights 2014 Task 51 Highlights 2014
March 2015 - PDF 0.19MB - Posted: 2017-05-30
By: Task 51/Maria Wall
A report on the state-of-the-art in education regarding urban planning with solar energy will be published in 2016. The main conclusion from this work is that there are many courses dealing with solar energy, but most of these courses are in engineering and architecture programs and focus on the technical aspects of solar energy, such as materials, system components and the construction of solar systems. In urban design and urban planning programs there are only few courses dealing with this topic. Thus, a huge gap is detected in urban planning education.

Supporting Documents

Task 51 - Solar Energy in Urban Planning - Annex Plan Task 51 - Solar Energy in Urban Planning - Annex Plan
February 2013 - PDF 0.21MB - Posted: 2017-06-02
By: Maria Wall (SE), Mark Snow (AU), Marja Lundgren (SE), Johan Dahlberg (SE), Annemie Wyckmans (NO), Tanja Siems (DE), Karsten Voss (DE), Katharina Simon (DE)
A large portion of the potential for energy efficiency in existing buildings and potential to utilize solar energy still remains unused. Globally, goals and specific targets are set up to reduce our environmental impact on climate and secure future supply of energy. The built environment accounts for over 40% of the world’s total primary energy use and 24% of greenhouse gas emissions. A combination of making buildings (refurbishing and new developments) more energy-efficient and using a larger fraction of renewable energy is therefore a key issue to reduce the non-renewable energy use and greenhouse gas emissions. Political statements and directives are already moving towards zero-energy buildings, communities and whole cities. An increased use of solar energy is one important part of the development ahead, where the urban fabric needs to utilize passive solar gains and daylight to reduce the energy use in buildings and for lighting outdoor environments, as well as to improve the inhabitants’ comfort indoors and in urban outdoor areas. Also, active solar energy systems integrated in the urban context will enable a supply of renewable energy primarily as heat and electricity, but also of solar cooling, helping cities reach sustainable solutions.